Celtic graves


The barrow excavated in 1938 and still visible today has a diameter of 22m. The height today is 0.8m, whereas the original height was 4-5 times greater.


The main central grave of the barrow was already plundered by grave-robbers in ancient times. A few ceramic finds nevertheless allow the barrow to be dated back to the more recent Hunsrück-Eifel culture (6th-5th century B.C.). The remains of a second burial were also discovered. This bore two bronze bracelets as burial treasure and is dated somewhat more recently than the central burial.



Burying the body under a barrow or cairn was the typical burial rite of the Celtic peoples until the 5th century B.C.. The higher the person's rank, the greater the communal expenditure when it came to constructing the burial pile and/or the richer the burial treasure.


In the 5th/4th century B.C. the burial tradition shifted to flat graves. From then on, the coffin with the body was laid in a hollow in the ground. The grave mound above ground was no longer the fashion…


The richly endowed princely graves in the neighbouring village of Schwarzenbach reflect the aristocracy. Its prosperity could be traced back to the iron ore deposits in this region. Were the princes of Schwarzenbach also the builders of the "Hunnenring"? One thing is certain, a contemporaneity between the oldest settlement findings from the enclosure wall and the burial treasure found in the Schwarzenbach princely graves can be proved beyond doubt…